Lava Oozes Out From Kilauea Volcano

Steam plumes rise as lava enters the Pacific Ocean after flowing to the water from a Kilauea volcano fissure on Hawaii's Big Island

More Small Blasts from Hawaii Volcano

"To all the victims out there of this very, very bad time, I say it publicly, it hurts like hell today", Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim said at a news conference late Monday.

His definition of stable means that lava continues to flow along a path toward the ocean that isn't threatening additional areas.

In the red circle is an explosion of steam and hot water, caused by ocean waves crashing onto molten lava. "FEMA doesn't have a magic wand to make it not happen".

Officials are transitioning to recovery efforts, with help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is starting to do damage assessments, Magno said.

USGS warned that lava flows from Fissure 8 remains a major concern as it channels along the south-east end of Big Island, turning into a corrosive cloud of muriatic acid and small glass particles as it hits the sea.

A look at the events leading up to Canada vs. USA battle
We get on the plane, and then this guy, Trudeau, starts blasting us. "But we say that with great sadness". President Donald Trump thinks our prime minister is "dishonest" and "meek and mild".


The ongoing lava flows have forced thousands of people from their homes, although many have been allowed to return on a temporary basis, particularly in the Leilani Estates area.

Because tradewind conditions returned, vog was projected to carry to the south and west sides of the island, while plumes of noxious gas coming out of the ocean around the new Kapoho coastline were pushing those emissions south, farther out over the ocean.

In the meantime, fewer workers are needed to staff a 24-hour operations center and officials are reducing checkpoints, Magno said.

A small explosion on the summit of Kilauea volcano has triggered an natural disaster but there are no reports of damage.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the explosion was equivalent to a magnitude of 5.4 and sent plumes of ash into the air. A part for repairs was expected soon, said Robert Ballard, science and operations officer for the weather service in Honolulu.

Latest News